Pints & Purls Edition 36: Saison Song

This is the thirty-sixth in a series of installments that will highlight one of my favorite brews and which knits to go with it!  None of the breweries or yarn companies are compensating me – these are just my opinions on my personal experiences!

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Brew: Strawberry Saison Song

Brewer: Horny Goat Brewing Company

Malts:

Hops:

IBU:

ABV: 6.5%IMG_5931

Flavors: If you can imagine having strawberry flavor without the fruity sweetness and combine that with the crisp and mild grassy bit – you can almost imagine what this tastes like.  I haven’t had strawberry mixed with beer yet but I like this one.

Knit Pairings:  Playful, assertive and fun, I recommend knitting some special novelty yarn with this beer.  I know, I know, I don’t recommend novelty yarn ever but if you’re going to have fun with the sippin’, you might as well have fun with the knittin’!  I’m thinking something with a fun texture, maybe some little sparkly bit, something you wouldn’t normally dig into to really bring out the uniqueness of the brew!

Notes: I wasn’t able to find a lot of the information that I usually include with this beer, I’ll update it as I’m able to!

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Let me know what you think!  Suggestions for future beers, more/different information to include, this is a work in progress so I won’t be offended by constructive advice!

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A Different Kind of Pretty

I love spring. There’s no doubt about it – I love the fresh green, the new life, the longer days and ample sunshine – it’s gorgeous. IMG_5885

But there’s something very special about winter.IMG_5888

Even with less sunlight and weather that makes you stay inside (whether you want to or not) more often.IMG_5911

Even as the greens fade away and the world looks a bit more monochromatic.IMG_5905

It’s just a different kind of pretty.

What’s your favorite part about winter?

WIP Wednesday: Started Something New

The Holidays are swiftly approaching and although we might not want to admit it, time stops for no one.  The snow has finally begun to arrive here in Colorado and that’s what makes it real for me – seeing the white stuff blow around outside.IMG_5854

I started a new project this week – another stocking!  This one isn’t for anyone in my own family, rather the new grandson of my Dad’s coworker.  I’m using some stash white and Knit Picks Swish in classic red and green.IMG_5859

The stocking will feature the little guy’s name (to be added with duplicate stitch at the end) along with some traditional tree and deer motifs underneath.

Are you working on holiday things? Gifts? Decorations?

Sample Knitting vs Test Knitting

Recently I posted in my Ravelry group that I was in search of Sample Knitters.  I find that there is a lot of confusion in what a Sample Knitter does and what a Test Knitter does, what is expected of them and how they are compensated.  I have previously written about the differences between Tech Editing and Test Knitting and today I’m going to touch on the differences between Sample Knitting and Test Knitting. Both involve a lot of responsibility and communication.

IMG_6598These are based on my own personal experience working primarily with independent designers and test knitters – details may change based on the situation and folks involved.

Sample Knitting:

  • Designer provides pattern and pattern support
  • Designer typically provides yarn
  • Sample Knitter knits the pattern exactly as it is written and if there are any questions whatsoever, they contact the designer to clarify before moving forward
  • Sample Knitter sends finished project and remaining yarn back to designer
  • Designer usually keeps the sample (or sends off to publication if that’s the case)
  • Designer pays Sample Knitter (range varies depending on the project – accessories vs garments, complexity, size, etc)

Test Knitting:

  • Designer provides pattern and pattern support
  • Designer does not typically provide yarn
  • Test Knitter knits the pattern as written unless he or she has previously clarified with the designer that modifications are allowed
  • Test Knitter keeps finished project and yarn
  • Test Knitters are usually compensated with free patterns – the number and type of pattern(s) are up to the designer’s discretion and are usually discussed before the test knit begins

Again, much of these terms are based on the individual and the work being completed – everything is subjective.  I hope this helps clear up some of the most common sources of confusion!

FO Friday: I Finished A Thing!

Sorry for the radio silence this week, I meant to blog – I really did! I have things I want to tell you and show you and I just haven’t had made the time to blog about them.

The other day I finished a thing, the first thing I’ve finished in what seems like forever. This cowl was started YEARS ago to use up leftover yarns, have something simple on the go all the time and make something one of a kind.IMG_5730

I started another one immediately after binding off for the same reasons – using up leftover yarns, having something simple (squooshy garter stitch!!) on the go all the time and having a one of a kind result when it’s finally completed.  Hopefully this one doesn’t take me a few years.IMG_5727

What are you working on this week?  Do you have fun weekend plans?

Upcoming Classes!

I’m excited to share with you all that I’ll finally be teaching again!

Not only will I be teaching, I’ll be doing so at one of the cutest new breweries in Denver – Grandma’s House.  This place combines some of my favorite things and if you’ve been reading this blog for any length of time at all, you know that I truly appreciate my beer and knitting time.  I’m so thrilled to be sharing things I’m so passionate about.

I’ll be offering a class on Beginning Knitting on November 12th and 19th – this will be a 2-part class in which we’ll learn basic knitting techniques and students will walk away with a small scarf and hat perfectly sized for a beer bottle.  More details can be found here.

The second class will be Intermediate Knitting in which we’ll learn how to knit a sweater using a common construction – top down with raglan sleeves.  Again, this project will fit your beer bottle!  More details can be found here.

What sorts of classes would you be interested in taking?  I’m hoping to continue to offer unique and fun classes and I’d love to hear from you which topics you want to learn!